Tag Archives: Principled Problem Solving

Axios reports college education is moving away from job training to problem-solving — right down Guilford College’s alley

Axios is reporting that “seismic shifts created by frontier technologies are challenging a centuries-old model of higher education.”

When it’s hard to predict what the jobs of the next 10 years will be — much less the next 50 years — acquiring the skills necessary to acquire skills is more important than the specifics of any given discipline.

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For those jobs that will exist, experts say, the uniquely human skill of problem-solving is essential, rather than a specific major.

The old model of studying one thing is giving way to a need for broadly trained workers.

MidLaw is not yet ready to concede that job preparation is the ultimate objective of a liberal education. (Life preparation is.) But – MidLaw must not let the dimming perspectives of age and wisdom, blind it to what is happening now. The world turns. Seismic shifts shake the frontiers. Wisdom grows.

Who doesn’t want problem solvers? Who doesn’t want to be one?

Axios failed to mention The Guilford Edge. It should have. Guilford College is on target.

Guilford has designed new structures to ensure that students can identify learning pursuits that excite them. As they work on what interests them, the Edge ensures that students will acquire skills – the skills they need to pursue immediate interests, which are also skills that they will need to solve new problems in the future.

Guilford has put in place new kinds of teachers, advisors, guides, and coaches. They supplement traditional academic advisors. These include the innovative Guilford Guides (every student is paired with a specially trained personal “guide” who has an advanced degree in counseling) and teams of on- and off- campus advisors, employers, alumni, who will give structure and grounding to students’ experiences.

The Guilford Edge aligns uniquely with the programs of Guilford’s signature Center for Principled Problem Solving.

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