Tag Archives: MidLaw Diet

Cahiers de Hoummous: Hummus Day’s a-comin’

We are once more in the annual run down to International Hummus Day.

The approach of the day has brought forward more of the encyclopedic hummus social media posts (well, collections of hummus links really) that we have become accustomed to.

BuzzFeed:  Signs you’re in a relationship with hummus

Huffington Post: Health benefits of hummus

Following these links requires assiduity – real assiduity, the kind that drives the truly committed to peel the skins off chickpeas pea by pea.

In this cascade of points and authorities has come yet another nuance in hummus technique. Now comes the suggestion that, after soaking your dried chickpeas overnight, and, just before you commit them to the cauldron for their hour-long boil-and-simmer, you might sautè them with the baking soda for three or four minutes in olive oil.

Observing this mounting enthusiasm, growing volume of commentary, and advancing granularity of detail, MidLaw is called to counsel:

First, temper obsession with dignity. As it is, you will be smearing a mess of semi-fluid, oil-drenched bean paste onto a shred of pita bread, then seeking to get it into your mouth without dripping anything on anything. Bear in mind that you are an exemplar of the species that produced the Code of Hammurabi, the Magna Carta and the State Toast of North Carolina.

Second, never in the pursuit of hummus, exalt occult technique over the immediacy of the moment. What is the MidLaw Way if not to stop, breathe, then consume radically?  And always, to ROLL YOUR OWN.

 

Probiotic flake bomb discovered in Greensboro

augA compelling culinary idea.

MidLaw discovered it last week. Turns out to be a centuries-old tradition in eastern Europe.

Phyllo pastry filled with sauerkraut. Genius.

You can get it at the Greensboro Farmers Market, at Augustino Gusto European Bakery. They make it with locally sourced sauerkraut, which they fill into a flaky (phyllo) pastry crust. No doubt there is a name for it, but MidLaw has not yet discovered that. Augustino Gusto is Romanian.

MidLaw foresees a successful chain of phyllo-sauerkraut restaurants in the offing. For now though, you are requested not to tell anyone. Do not disrupt the market for this incomparable probiotic flake bomb.

Now that MidLaw has moved in, supplies may be limited. Please do not buy any without checking first with MidLaw.

Greensboro Farmers Curb Market

Red kidney beans break out

kidney-beans

As the International Year of Pulses draws slowly to its close, pause to marvel at the humble kidney bean.

Red kidney beans contain more antioxidants than glamorous blueberries or pomegranate juice.

Kidney beans.

Go, you crazy little red-headed, kidney-shaped whack jobs!

(Chickpeasnot far behind. What pulses!)

It’s the season for MidLaw’s somewhat famous MidWinter Supper

It’s time once more to republish the MidLaw MidWinter Supper.Supper

Last year the MidWinter Supper was supplemented with an enhanced fish feature, “Helen’s Famous Smoked Fish Dip” (the provenance is at the link). Some dip.

We’ll let this year’s embellishment be MidLaw’s recent inquiry into the skinning of chickpeas, which may, after all, be contra-indicated for the hummus américaine. You decide.

The Supper’s the thing. That hummus, that fish, that dip. And the beverage.

Cahiers de Hoummous: to skin a pea

skinsRemoving the skins from chickpeas when you make your hummus is something you just don’t hear enough about. And there are multiple schools of thought on the subject.

Maureen Abood, Yotam Ottolenghi, Sami Tamimi and others counsel soaking then cooking dried peas a long time with baking soda, straining them, adding cold water, and then rubbing the skins off with your fingers. (Same method can be adopted for canned chickpeas, where you microwave instead of simmering for a long time.)

Others suggest rubbing your peas with a towel. See the Steamy Kitchen, rub-them-with-a-paper-towel method.

But traditionalist Amy Riolo, the author of Nile Style, says that she skins her peas one by one. She says

To peel chickpeas, hold them in between your thumb and index finger over a bowl and squeeze. The chickpea will come through and you will be left with the skin in your hand. I like to peel them while I’m watching television or talking on the phone, and leave them ready in the refrigerator, so that later on I can make this dish.

She handles each chickpea, one at the time. Well, there you go. If you remove each skin from each pea, one by one, you will have some creamy hummus.

Perfectly acceptable hummus, however, can be fashioned from skin-on peas. Partially skinned peas are fine, too. (Don’t let the perfect be the enemy of the good.) You might want to give your food processor a few more turns for skin-on peas than for the naked ones, then you’ll be good to go.

It’s your hummus, you choose.

A word about the television, though. We cannot condone watching television while you skin your peas. In some jurisdictions, watching cable TV news in particular while skinning chickpeas may be regarded as chickpea abuse.

[Broader MidLaw hummus wisdom was recapped at year end.]

Cahiers de Hoummous: the onset of winter

pumpkin_spice_grandeThey speak to me at Christmas time of pumpkin hummus.

It is the get of the multi-culture. Some at this season reprise even the beet fallacy.

Look it up. There is no plural of hummus.

Hummus is of chickpeas.

Rightly, we contest dried versus canned chickpeas. And then we conclude that either can do. And avidly, we pour into our food processors other pulses, other beans, and other vegetables to mash them up. But those are not hummus. They are dips and pastes and sauces. That must find their own names.

Anything else is the theft of a word that is the property of the chickpea. Chickpeas, garbanzo beans, ceci nuts, sometimes also known as Egyptian peas, Bengal grams, and Kabuli chana: they own hummus.

You may flavor your hummus as you will. After all, you are not choosing a plastic cup on a supermarket shelf. This is MidLaw. You are rolling your own. Radical self-determination is the essence of MidLaw Mind.

So, roasted red peppers are fine. A soupcon of vinegar from time to time perhaps. Frankly, pumpkin spice sounds a bit effete, but OK. For flavor. That’s up to you.

But do not take a simple and sturdy word that has stood for millennia. It does not belong to you. “Hummus” comes from the Arabic word meaning “chickpeas.” It does not mean pumpkins.

Pumpkus?

CHRISTMAS NOTE: The single question that MidLaw receives most often is, “What is your recipe for hummus?” Longtime MidLaw readers know that hummus culture is a journey, not a destination. Lifelong learning is at the core of MidLaw Mind. Revelation is continuing. Still, in recognition of the season and feeling the onset of winter, MidLaw will bring back key hummus-recipe-and-tips links for an upcoming holiday special. You must return to MidLaw for the holidays.

Cahiers de Hoummous: Two hummus tips to go

sumac-in-blue-thimble-post

Sumac

MidLaw normally seeks to confine the Cahiers de Hoummous  to hummus topics only and to dole them out at a measured pace. Just now though, we are sitting on not one but two slightly collateral tips that are questing to be free. The post-Thanksgiving interval seems a fitting moment to give them voice.

First: sumac. The argument is made that ground sumac should have an equal place on the table with salt and pepper. Agreed. Sumac is a characteristic spice of the Middle East. It is
commonly described as tart, sour or astringent — mild, but in the nature of lemon or vinegar.

Just try it. Get you some and see what you think. Sumac is a likely seasoning for hummus and many other foods: chicken, fish, rice, potatoes, fried foods, in soda to drink (seriously). Could be healthy. Who knows?

mssabbaha2

Mssabbaha with sumac

Second: boil an egg and serve it with your hummus. This can be for breakfast or with any other egg-appropriate meal, mezze or snack. Cook the egg for exactly 6 minutes and 50 seconds (per Momofuku). Fill a bowl with cold water and ice. When the eggs are done, transfer them immediately to the ice bath. After that, you know what to do.

For this, you will want your hummus creamy and your egg soft in the middle. (Remember: eggs are back. You can eat them now.)

You’ll be rocking and rolling soon.

MidLaw chauvinism

A photo by Charlie Harutaka. unsplash.com/photos/Gacd_XeSGQk

Photo by Charlie Harutaka.

Occasionally MidLaw has been characterized as diagnosing the obsolescence of mid-size firms. Sometimes we’re even said to be predicting the demise of mid-size firms. So I was glad that Kathryn Whitaker titled her JD Supra interview with me as “The Case for the Mid-Sized Law Firm.”

Of course, from time to time MidLaw does seek to understand the changes around us. And, from time to time it adverts to those who predict the end of the practice of law as we know it. Sometimes, MidLaw countenances those who proclaim the end of law firms altogether. But withal — MidLaw is solid – firm – in the conviction that mid-sized firms will be the last to go.

Kathryn quotes me as saying

A mid-sized firm is the best place on the planet to be a lawyer. The key is direct engagement with clients and colleagues.

Well, that’s what happens with oral interviews. You get all wound up and then you say something that you can’t take back. So, I am staked out. But, at least I believe what I said. No pivot here.

[In an earlier post, MidLaw proposed to republish Kathryn’s  JD Supra interview in this space, but I have come to the conclusion that the thing is just too long to put here, especially when it’s already been published over there. So, here’s another link instead.]

The main thing is: We will be the last to go!

Henceforth please understand: when MidLaw acknowledges the challenges that beset us, I am  simply setting the stage for us once more to demonstrate our resilience – to flex our agility. Remember, it was MidLaw who said these five years past, “Mid-Sized Firms Are the Only Hope for the Future of the Legal Profession,” and, later, more modestly, “I like MidLaw’s chances.”

Cahiers de Hoummous: hummus wars re-kindled in provocative WUNC article

Is hummus a casus belli, or the path to peace?hummus large

This is old territory for MidLaw.

As MidLaw has patiently outlined, there is great potential for contention between Arabs and Jews about who owns hummus and whose is best. There is no shortage of those who would take up the cudgels. But there has also been a movement towards peace and reconciliation.

At this delicate moment, WUNC, the public radio station, has stepped in with a provocative article demarking differences and provoking antagonists.

MidLaw is a longtime witness and sometime casualty of North Carolina’s divisive and destructive BBQ wars (also regularly roiled by WUNC coverage), And MidLaw has constantly counseled hummus peoples that war is not the answer. For those who are drawn to bean dips, MidLaw’s message is: roll your own with MidLaw Mind. Do not be seduced by external measures of quality or value — and certainly, do not be drawn into backward-looking controversies over who started it all. The debates that matter are: How much lemon juice? When is the olive oil added? What’s this about not peeling the garlic? And, of course, whether it’s OK to use canned chickpeas, and whether and how long to microwave canned peas? And MidLaw can respect each person’s answer.

If however, you cannot resist wading into the controversy, recall MidLaw’s early observation that, although there are surely those who disagree, many signs suggest that hummus may have originated in Greensboro about fifteen years ago. And, remember also that when MidLaw made a recent hummus trip to the Levant, the best hummus in the region was found to be precisely on the boundary, on the Green Line, between the West Bank and Israel.

War is not the answer.

[A MidLaw Dip in the direction of Bill Ross and Mack Sperling who were quick off the mark calling attention to the WUNC piece.]

Terra Milles

terra MThank goodness I was asked to introduce my friends Terry and Joe Graedon (the Peoples’ Pharmacy) who were speaking to a Greensboro civic club last month; and thank goodness I heard them say that eggs, oils, fat (including reasonable amounts of saturated fats) and dietary cholesterol are BACK. They are no longer bad for you; they are mostly good for you; and they may not even make you gain weight. All things in moderation, of course.

Thank goodness I had heard that by the time I arrived at Terra Milles. Terra Milles is little more than a kitchen that sits on a dock fifteen feet or so from the Mediterranean Sea in El Grao at Castellón de La Plana, Spain. Around the kitchen on the dock, tables and chairs are gathered under an open shelter. At Terra Milles they prepare and serve whatever the boats have just brought in. The only fresher seafood is what the fishermen eat before the boat gets back to shore.

Sardinas

Sardinas

Fideua_-_xurde

Fideuà

Cuttlefish

Sepia (cuttlefish)

 

Sardines with a green sauce. Cuttlefish sauteed in olive oil. Fideuà with aioli. Tomatoes, olives and onions

terra M tomates

Tomatoes, olives, onions

Oh, and beer.

Fidueà is a new discovery. Essentially, it’s paella but made with small curly noodles (vermicelli) instead of rice, cooked in fish broth with bits of many sea creatures. With aioli. Spectacular.

Look, I was going to eat all that stuff anyway. And drink it. But I’m so glad I heard Joe and Terry say that almost all of it was not so bad for you (had I only exercised moderation). There is a Balm in Gilead.