Category Archives: Liberal arts

Axios reports college education is moving away from job training to problem-solving — right down Guilford College’s alley

Axios is reporting that “seismic shifts created by frontier technologies are challenging a centuries-old model of higher education.”

When it’s hard to predict what the jobs of the next 10 years will be — much less the next 50 years — acquiring the skills necessary to acquire skills is more important than the specifics of any given discipline.

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For those jobs that will exist, experts say, the uniquely human skill of problem-solving is essential, rather than a specific major.

The old model of studying one thing is giving way to a need for broadly trained workers.

MidLaw is not yet ready to concede that job preparation is the ultimate objective of a liberal education. (Life preparation is.) But – MidLaw must not let the dimming perspectives of age and wisdom, blind it to what is happening now. The world turns. Seismic shifts shake the frontiers. Wisdom grows.

Who doesn’t want problem solvers? Who doesn’t want to be one?

Axios failed to mention The Guilford Edge. It should have. Guilford College is on target.

Guilford has designed new structures to ensure that students can identify learning pursuits that excite them. As they work on what interests them, the Edge ensures that students will acquire skills – the skills they need to pursue immediate interests, which are also skills that they will need to solve new problems in the future.

Guilford has put in place new kinds of teachers, advisors, guides, and coaches. They supplement traditional academic advisors. These include the innovative Guilford Guides (every student is paired with a specially trained personal “guide” who has an advanced degree in counseling) and teams of on- and off- campus advisors, employers, alumni, who will give structure and grounding to students’ experiences.

The Guilford Edge aligns uniquely with the programs of Guilford’s signature Center for Principled Problem Solving.

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Guilford College gearing up for ground-breaking program

Guilford College is rethinking what it takes to transform 21st Century high school graduates into skilled, grounded 21st Century human beings.

Famously, one-hundred-and-seventy years ago Nereus Mendenhall said that the business of Guilford College is to

produce men and women with well-trained minds and good hearts; people who can think for themselves and not be blown about by every wind of doctrine.

Pretty old-fashioned, what? NOT. But some renovation is in order.

The new student experience at Guilford, called “the Guilford Edge” brings 21st Century thinking to the old mission. It’s re-gearing the College to bring to students new personal and developmental resources that match and support Guilford’s traditional academic strengths. In keeping with Guilford’s 175-year tradition, the student experience at Guilford will be tailored to each student, personally and one-by-one.

New facilities, new curriculum, new student engagement-and-support programs, are coming. First is re-imagining the buildings and grounds to hold and advance the new student experience. Already, new facilities are generating new energy.

Between now and Fall of 2019 the rest is coming.

World seems to be orienting itself to the program at Guilford College

Axios Future is reporting that creativity, persuasion, collaboration, adaptability and time management are the skills most in demand in the workplace. Axios cites the LinkedIn Learning Blog which in turn is based on LinkedIn’s 2018 Workplace Learning Report.

LinkedIn in goes on to identify the 25 most needed hard skills, as well.

It’s right remarkable how both sets of skills line up with the Guilford Edge at Guilford College. And see how that lines up with this recent post and the one after that.

Sports and arts at Guilford College

Guilford College has very strong arts and very strong athletics. Right now, both are being re-imagined and newly resourced there.

Dana Giola, the Poet Laureate of California and former chair of the National Endowment for the Arts, once commented

I don’t like sports, but you’ve got to admire the energy, creativity, and innovation that goes into sports. And it’s very similar to arts. It’s a way of focusing human energy to create these symbolic encounters which have enormous emotional resonance to audiences

Guilford’s got’em both.

Giola’s comment affirms Guilford’s thinking. The student experience at Guilford crosses traditional boundaries. It finds connections, focuses energy, teaches the importance of symbolic encounters. It’s creative.

These are elements of a life lived well. Both sports and arts teach those things HANDS ON at Guilford College.

I’m amazed continually at how often people who spent their college years at athletics and arts and literature (and other such endeavors) turn out to have the chops to get things done.

Athletes make great executives; French majors make the BEST lawyers.

Cow pasture no more; what it is was football

UNC announces opening indoor football facility. Can’t help but wonder what Andy Griffith would have made of that.

A word fitly spoken

By Clara Peeters – The Bridgeman Art Library

“A word fitly spoken is like apples of gold in baskets of silver.”

This peerless aphorism has been concealed from me before now. All this time it was at Proverbs 25:11. (How clever they were to hide it in such a place.) Today a friend uncovered it for me.

I am releasing it to the wild.

Renovating in the groves of academe

The Greensboro News and Record has a good article about it: Guilford College is on theGuilford College 1 move.

A game-changing new curriculum is on the way. “The Guilford Edge” – coming next year – will be a major innovation in higher education and for Guilford. It puts the focus on the student, re-imagines the college experience, and connects immediately to the world that students will graduate into. But that’s next year.

The Orangerie

Right now, Guilford is reshaping the campus – the buildings and grounds – to hold the new program. 

Maybe the most dramatic uplifts are the Nancy-and-Dennis-Quaintance-inspired restoration of dormitories and living spaces, the creation of a dynamic new Student Quad, the Orangerie, and upgrades to the athletics facilities. But those flashy projects overlook what feel like unique and most amazing reinventions of the arts facilities at the Hege-Cox complex, with exhilarating expansions of Guilford’s traditionally very strong arts department. There’s a new sculpture studio, a new ceramics studio, new galleries, and new, state-of-the-art classrooms. Arts students can hardly argue (as some do in other places) that sports are prioritized over arts at Guilford.

Guilford hege-cox_addition-sculpture

One of the new studios behind Hege-Cox

Excitement is palpable among the sculptors. The new spaces and new equipment and other facilities are fostering impressive, contemporary student work and the student locker room calls to mind the locker rooms over at Ragan-Brown Fieldhouse, except with artworks in progress in the lockers instead of “seasoned” sports gear.

What’s more impressive is to learn what happens in the new classrooms, where students and professors integrate arts, social sciences, physical sciences, and traditional liberal arts into reimagined learning – and connect the learned skills of sculptors with real-world, contemporary issues and problem-solving. The sculpture professor over there is on fire with the ways that learning sculpture translates into practical, meaningful work across a broad spectrum of industries after college.

MidLaw would never argue that sculpture is not a great preparation for 21st Century law practice.

To the contrary.

Not your traditional groves of academe. Not only art for art’s sake.

Night descends

In recent weeks I have learned that eggs are good for you. Eat them. Coffee is good for you. Drink it.

Drinking alcohol is bad for you. Even one drink. Orange juice is not great for you. And there is news about small-dose aspirin.

Myers-Briggs is not grounded in science. I like people after all. Who knew?

Has this news come too late?

I am a knight without armor in a savage land.

Quaker witches, a continuing problem

Not long ago I ran across this account of William Penn’s decision at Pennsylvania’s “one and only witchcraft trial”:

After a Quaker jury had found the woman innocent, Penn asked her “Art thou a witch? Hast thou ridden through the air on a broomstick?” To her affirmative reply, Penn answered that she had a perfect right to ride on a broomstick, that he knew of no law whatever against it, and ordered her discharged.

I worry about the friendly skies in our high tech future.  A mess of Quaker witches and drones running into each other.

Heads up, friends.

Guilford College facing acutest issues of social change in forthright, creative ways

Interesting to see how Guilford College President Jane Fernandes’ most recent post at her blog, Jane’s Friendly View, “What #metoo Compels Us to Do” parallels the core theme of Guilford creative writing professor Mylène Dressler’s new novel, The Last to See Me.

To victims of sexual assault and harassment, Jane says “We see you. We understand you. You are real.” Professor Dressler comes at the same thing in a ghost story.

I’m pretty sure the two did not coordinate what they have done. (That would be a conspiracy, wouldn’t it?)

Since 1837, the Guilford College community is always wrestling with the acutest social issues of the times. Always learning. Always creative. Always facing forward.