Category Archives: Divers Items

Special Veterans Day Alert: Good news for NC veterans

VA Kernersville Health Care Center

MidLaw wishes to join the great chorus of the day with a message for veterans.

If you are a veteran who lives in central North Carolina, don’t believe what you may have heard. The outpatient medical services available to you at the Veterans Administration are quite amazing.

The Health Care Center in Kernersville is a marvel.

It’s new. It’s nicer – a more inviting place to be – than any medical facility MidLaw can name.

There’s a computer there that’s just waiting to hear from you – and it will ensure that when you come to the Center, there will be virtually no waiting. Computer though it is, it’s surrounded by all these people who seem very highly motivated to ensure that you are attended to.

Best of all: free hearing aids! State-of-the-art, top-of-the-line hearing aids and audiologists with accompanying equipment who are expert, responsive and experienced.

As far as I know, any hearing impairment is eligible for treatment. But, in particular, if you have a bit of a gap in the range that your left ear can hear, that’s consistent with exposure to firearms in a military setting. And, the VA’s the place for you to be.

And what devices they supply! My cell phone calls now come directly into my head. Nobody hears it ring but me. Music, podcasts – they all come straight into your head (if you want’em to).

Most astonishing! Since acquiring these devices, I’ve learned that very often, when people’s lips are moving that means they are seeking to communicate with you. And, my television has begun to function much better. Somehow though, there has been little improvement in my ability to hear certain communications from Sally. Nothing’s perfect.

MidLaw, at least, thanks the Veterans Administration for its service.

Advertisements

Cahiers de Hoummous: At the right end of the Mediterranean they make hummus, at the left end …

I have come among the people who invented mayonnaise.

If you live in a warm, dry place adjoined by the Mediterranean Sea, which is full of good food, not the least of it shellfish, and if, already, you have wines that complement the climate, and then you invent mayonnaise – and fresh allioli – might you not conclude that you have come to the end of history?

My last challenge is that, as I doze, the sun moves across the sky. I must shift my position to stay in the sun. It keeps me young.

 

Advertisement for myself: The Aging of Professionals and What Can Be Done to Stop It

Herewith is essentially a press release to account for where I am and what I am doing.

Ed Winslow to present at World Conference of Lawyers and Accountants in Vienna

Brooks Pierce partner Ed Winslow has been invited to speak at the 2017 World Conference of the Geneva Group International (GGI) taking place from Oct. 19-22 in Vienna, Austria. GGI is a worldwide alliance of independent law, audit, tax, accounting, and professional advisory firms, ranked among the largest such organizations in the world with 566 member firms in 123 countries.  Winslow’s topic is “The Aging of Lawyers and What Can Be Done to Stop It.”

Following his presentation, Winslow will lead a panel discussion of lawyers and accountants from France, Germany, Washington, DC and Wichita, Kansas in which the panelists will address progressive management practices of professional services firms responding to the retirement of the Baby Boom Generation, including succession planning, creative roles for senior professionals, and alternatives to complete retirement.

Winslow, former managing partner of Brooks Pierce, has practiced law for over 40 years, with a focus on litigation, corporate law, and banking and financial services. He is the current chair of the board of trustees for the North Carolina State Bar Plan for Interest on Lawyers’ Trust Accounts and was the first North Carolina attorney appointed to the American Bar Association’s Commission on the Interest on Lawyers’ Trust Accounts. He is also chair of the board of trustees for Guilford College and a past member of the board of governors of the North Carolina Bar Association. He served as general counsel for the North Carolina Bankers Association for several decades.

 

Sound off!

I was at the Veterans Administration Health Center this morning, getting lined up for hearing aids. I went down to the Audiology section to check in, where I was second in line.

The receptionist asked the guy in front of me what his name was. He said, “I’m sorry, what did you say?”

I was in the right place.

The VA Health Center in Kernersville, N.C., is one of my new favorite places. The facility is fantastic. The place is well organized. There is virtually no waiting. The service and care are spot on. And, after virtually every encounter, they say, “Thank you for your service.” This morning, a lady told me that I look nice today.

I’m going back.

The Splendid Table comes to Greensboro, not for the hummus

The Splendid Table” is readily recognized as a radio program/podcast/website/blog focused on food. To see “Greensboro” identified as a subject of a recent installment was a minor jolt.

My knee jerked: “Please, not another paean to North Carolina barbecue.”

Maybe, hummus?  MidLaw was the first to posit the theory that hummus originated in Greensboro.

As it turns out, The Splendid Table’s focus is neither barbecue nor hummus. It is “the Greensboro Four” who historically sat in for lunch at Woolworth’s in the 1960’s. In a brief interview, Joseph McNeil gives a dignified and generous account of the sit-ins (it’s impossible not to like the guy), reprising the now iconic, unidentified white lady who encouraged the students, and crediting the solidarity of the UNC-G (then, Women’s College) students who came out to support the Four. But he trashed the food.

The Splendid Table picked up the interview from New York’s Other People’s Food. The theme is “the universality of food to find common ground amid racial and cultural differences.”

MidLaw is able to attest: “universality” and not “quality” is the right theme for downtown food in Greensboro at the time. In the 1970’s, when MidLaw set up shop at Brooks Pierce in downtown Greensboro, Woolworth’s was one of a limited few venues for lunch downtown.

Joseph McNeil does not recount being served in 1960, but he does recall returning to Woolworth’s in the 1970’s after the lunch counter was integrated. He says the coffee was bad and the apple pie was bland (“it sucked,” he says).

There weren’t many choices for lunch in downtown Greensboro back then. The big department stores were departing for the shopping centers, taking with them their cafeterias and dining rooms. What was left were lunch rooms in office towers and a small handful of stand-alone restaurants. MidLaw recalls Mathews Grill, a meat-and-two-vegetables place whose proprietor was busy parleying restaurant proceeds into real estate; The Lotus, a mid-century Chinese restaurant that was far from home; Randy’s Sandwich Shop, which served the standard sandwiches of the day; the Southeastern Soda Shop; and a delicatessen whose name I can’t recall that famously served “Kosher Dogs” (hot dogs smothered in sauerkraut). And Woolworth’s. Mr. McNeil’s word captures everything except the kosher dogs: “bland.”

Woolworth’s led the way. The meats at Woolworth’s were such that the smartest order was a Vegetable Plate. The vegetables came largely from cans and frozen packets. Macaroni and cheese was prepared in large sheets and cut into squares with a knife to make a serving. Greens from a can. The squash casserole was redeemed, if at all, by cheese melted in the juices of the squash and onions. Salt was the key ingredient.

Except those who were members of the Greensboro City Club, lunch most often required flight to the shopping centers, where the great American culinary innovation of the day awaited: the all-you-can-eat salad bar.

So, Joseph McNeil’s commentary on mid-1970’s downtown Greensboro food is about right.

Today though is different. Today, there are a couple of places downtown who might actually earn a place on The Splendid Table.

Here again, McNeil gets it right. He says “we’re going to make progress sometimes in spite of ourselves.”

Hummus Alert — Time Sensitive — Tomato-hummus perihelion at peak this weekend

This seasonal notice should, ideally, have been posted earlier. Regrettably, it was not.

Of course, the foundational post was here all along as loyal followers know. You might have protected yourself.

There is still time. This weekend marks the peak of the tomato-hummus perihelion. Act now. Here is what you do.

Although a preference for Edgecombe tomatoes has been identified in the past, those sourced at the Greensboro Farmers Market have been determined to be equivalent in quality and most dimensions of flavor. MidLaw acknowledges that vine-ripened tomatoes from other North Carolina sources may also meet immediate needs.

WARNING! This alert is subject to unpredictable forces in the tomato markets, including spikes in demand and supply imbalances.

Caveat emptor.

                                  

Cahiers de Hoummous: I am a moveable feast

I learned recently that there are more organisms — each one a separate little fellow — in the last two inches of my colon than all the human beings who have ever existed.

They work together, these fellows, for good. Shaping up digestion, toning up the immune system, and, apparently, limiting weight gain.

When things go wrong, you will regret it, but when they are treated right, the little fellows go about their business without complaint, promoting harmony, efficacy, and a sense of well-being.

Sauerkraut and yogurt are particularly popular with them, but they like most kinds of healthy organic foods. Vegetables mostly. They like diversity.

Not surprisingly, chickpeas are popular. So is hummus.

Knowing that they are down there – all 70 trillion* of them – going about their business and mine – bumping, jostling, collaborating, getting along – pleases me.

I am a moveable feast, a peaceable kingdom.

*  Figures are approximate and may vary by tens of trillions in either direction.

Guilford College President uniquely prepared to prepare students uniquely — intelligence that is not artificial

Jane Fernandes’ Blog

Gradually, articles written about her, her own writing, and her speeches and oral presentations are showing us more of Jane Fernandes’ personal story.

The President of Guilford College has been deaf from birth. So was her mother. Over time, we have learned that

  • When Jane was a small child, her mother would give her a few coins or a small bill and send her to the store, charging her to buy some item, pay for it, and return with the correct change — without the store keeper realizing that Jane could not hear.
  • Jane attended public schools and after school, her mother would ask “What questions did you ask at school today?” (“My mother knew that if I asked my own questions and found the answers to them, I would have powerful preparation for life.”)
  • Throughout her school days, Jane’s mother caused her to take piano lessons. When Jane complained, her mother sent her to a concert. (“I sat very close to the stage and watched Van Cliburn. As he played, I saw his soul. I saw what chords meant.”)
  • In college, Jane majored in French and spent a year in France.
  • At Guilford College, Jane celebrates the Eastern Music Festival, which is held on Guilford’s campus.

There’s more to tell, but you tell me:

  • Is that a practical liberal arts education or what?
  • Can you imagine a better preparation for a 21st Century educator?
  • Can you imagine a better orientation for a leader in a learning community at this moment?
  • What core capabilities do you want today’s emerging adults to have for what’s coming?

And how about that mother?

A second comment on The Bright Hour

While Nina Riggs’ The Bright Hour is “a memoir of living and dying” which recounts Nina Riggs’ experience of cancer and approaching death, it is profoundly and meaningfully humorous.

I find the writing and the insights to have particular relevance for professionals. Although the book is not explicitly didactic, it is so for a moment. Nina writes:

We contain things and give shape to things in order to be less afraid of them. … The crafted idea does this. It’s why I write. The metaphor does this. … I can hear Montaigne hollering: break it open, look inside, feel it, write it down.

Much to find in this book.

Go get this book – Nina Riggs, The Bright Hour – from Greensboro but far beyond

Nina Riggs’ The Bright Hour, justly, has gathered national appreciation (acclaim, really).  Reviewers say her “memoir of living and dying” is a “stunning” expression of the human spirit. Across the country, readers are recognizing and celebrating it, and rightly.

Nina was a Greensboro poet and the wife of former Brooks Pierce lawyer, our friend John Duberstein. Her story and stunning book have created a quiet sense of wonder and more than a little pride here.

I see The Bright Hour as a liberal education – in itself – and, at the same time, a vibrant affirmation of the value of a liberal education. To make of cancer and a final illness what Nina has done and how …

Nina Riggs, Ralph Waldo Emerson, and Michel de Montaigne. How she walked with them, in her Greensboro life and how the three of them made meaning together (and with others) as Nina’s life came to an end are a profound validation of a liberal education and a compelling, ennobling demonstration of what it is, and how, to be human.

Go buy and read this book.