Monthly Archives: April 2019

The march of 21st Century banking law — hermeneutics exposed

Lalita Clozel at the Wall Street Journal is reporting that:

Fed Vice Chairman for Supervision Randal Quarles said the agency’s policies on bank control have been difficult to parse, except for people “who have spent a long apprenticeship in the subtle hermeneutics of Federal Reserve lore, receiving the wisdom of their elders through oral tradition.

Wall Street Journal, April 24, 2019, Lalita Clozel, “Fed Moves to Ease Rules for Bank Investors.”

So, the Federal Reserve is promulgating new rules intended to elucidate (and loosen) its bank control policies. And so begins the lustration of yet another once tidy and “pleasantly remunerative” corner of MidLaw’s erstwhile law practice. 

This must be among the final steps in eradicating law practices where obscure practitioners could dispense subtle hermeneutics for a fee. Shame that.

O tempora, o algorismi!

 

Cartoon by P.C. Vey, New Yorker, March 9, 2009

Eggs mount comeback at Mayo Clinic — paralleling classic cultural progression

In the beginning, eggs were good. Two every morning.

Then they got bad. Cholesterol.

But they came back. Dietary cholesterol does not determine what’s in your arteries.

Most recently, they went bad yet again.  A study of early deaths among egg eaters.

Still, they return. Over at the Mayo Clinic. Mayo says it’s not the eggs, it’s you.

Eggs are good for some people, bad for others. Depends on what you bring to the table.

We’ve seen this before. In fact, repeatedly.

Religion. First, God was an external, objective actor. Then He became the possession of the priests. Then, of congregations. And, ultimately, is a matter of the experience of individual believers.

Art. First, art was a re-creation of an animal. Then, a representation of objective reality. Then, a stimulus of the viewer’s senses. Then, a stimulus of the viewer’s subjective experience.

Industry. First, a craft. Then, mass production, automation. Then, artificial intelligence.  Ultimately, individual, 3-D printed products.

Law. First, decrees of the strong. Then, decrees of the ordained. Then, Natural Law. Then, legislation and interpretation. Ultimately smart contracts, implemented by blockchain.

Hummus. First, hand-crafted along the Nile. Then, a national food. Then, a global, plastic-packed, shelf product. Ultimately, any pulverized, creamy dip. Finally, retrieved by the roll-your-own ethic of the MidLaw Diet. You don’t buy it; you make it. Your way

Now it’s eggs. But it’s not the eggs. It’s not the cholesterol. It’s you.

If eggs are back, can bacon be far behind?

Axios reports college education is moving away from job training to problem-solving — right down Guilford College’s alley

Axios is reporting that “seismic shifts created by frontier technologies are challenging a centuries-old model of higher education.”

When it’s hard to predict what the jobs of the next 10 years will be — much less the next 50 years — acquiring the skills necessary to acquire skills is more important than the specifics of any given discipline.

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For those jobs that will exist, experts say, the uniquely human skill of problem-solving is essential, rather than a specific major.

The old model of studying one thing is giving way to a need for broadly trained workers.

MidLaw is not yet ready to concede that job preparation is the ultimate objective of a liberal education. (Life preparation is.) But – MidLaw must not let the dimming perspectives of age and wisdom, blind it to what is happening now. The world turns. Seismic shifts shake the frontiers. Wisdom grows.

Who doesn’t want problem solvers? Who doesn’t want to be one?

Axios failed to mention The Guilford Edge. It should have. Guilford College is on target.

Guilford has designed new structures to ensure that students can identify learning pursuits that excite them. As they work on what interests them, the Edge ensures that students will acquire skills – the skills they need to pursue immediate interests, which are also skills that they will need to solve new problems in the future.

Guilford has put in place new kinds of teachers, advisors, guides, and coaches. They supplement traditional academic advisors. These include the innovative Guilford Guides (every student is paired with a specially trained personal “guide” who has an advanced degree in counseling) and teams of on- and off- campus advisors, employers, alumni, who will give structure and grounding to students’ experiences.

The Guilford Edge aligns uniquely with the programs of Guilford’s signature Center for Principled Problem Solving.