The Trouble with Lawyers — new book identifies the challenges, suggests responses

Rhode bookThere’s a new book, another book, about the trouble with lawyers. It’s called The Trouble with Lawyers.

The National Law Journal has published a short interview with the the author, Stanford law professor Deborah Rhode. In that interview, Professor Rhode makes two points that have been made here before.

NLJ: What is the biggest challenge that the American bar is facing today?

Rhode: I think it’s a shameful irony that the nation with one of the world’s highest concentration of lawyers does such a poor job of making their services available to those who need help most. Over four-fifths of the legal needs of poor individuals are not being met. And that’s a problem with enormous social costs.

NLJ: Are law schools part of the problem or part of the solution?

Rhode: I think the one-size-fits-all model we currently have fails to address the diversity in what lawyers do. It just makes no sense to train in the same way someone who’s going to be doing divorces in a small town and the person who’s going to be doing financial mergers and acquisitions on Wall Street. We need to recognize the diversity in legal tasks and to have corresponding diversity in legal education. The book argues for having one-year, two-year and three-year degrees.

Deborah Rhode is a Stanford law professor, said to be the nation’s most frequently cited scholar on legal ethics. She’s a past president of the Association of American Law Schools.

If nothing else, it’s instructive to see which issues are rising to the top: the two identified above and others also addressed in the book.

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